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Auditions for "The Rememberer"

Auditions Feb. 8, 9 am-Noon; Feb. 11-12, 6 to 9 p.m.

Red Curtain announces auditions for Steven Dietz's powerful play, "The Rememberer," directed by Jaike Spottedwolf, with performance dates of April 10-26, 2020.

"The Rememberer" tells the true story of Joyce Cheeka, a young Squaxin Indian girl, who is forcibly taken from her home and placed in a government-run school in 1911. As the chosen "rememberer" for her tribe—an honor passed down to her from her grandfather, Mud Bay Sam—it is Joyce's duty to pass on the stories, history and wisdom of her people. However, the aims of the white boarding school is to eliminate any trace of Joyce's heritage. Through her friendship with the headmaster at the school, and with the help of her "spirit guide," Joyce succeeds in forming a bridge between this new world and the world of her ancestors. Through her patience, grit, humor, curiosity and inclusiveness of spirit, she does honor to the words of her elders: "Each day is a gift. And to waste that day is inexcusable. Account for yourself. Be useful."


Auditions will be held Feb. 8 from 9 a.m. to noon at the Hibulb Cultural Center, on a drop-in basis. No reservation or prepared monologue is required for the Saturday morning auditions.



 Traditional auditions are slated for Feb. 11-12, from 6-9pm at the Red Curtain Arts Center (9315 State Ave., Suite J in Marysville). Actors should prepare a 2-minute dramatic monologue. Native American actors are especially encouraged to audition, and we will also be looking for Native singers, dancers, and drummers. Head shots and resumes may be submitted in advance to office@redcurtainfoundation.org.


To reserve a time slot on Feb. 11 or 12, visit our sign up link at https://www.signupgenius.com/go/70A054BA4AD2FABFA7-auditions and select the day and time you would like to attend. 



Red Curtain holds diversity in our casting as a top priority, and encourages color-conscious and gender blind casting. All roles are open at this time. Note that ages listed are for the character, not the actor. This is a community theatre presentation, with no monetary compensation offered for actors.


Character Breakdowns

*Joyce- 12 year old, Native girl.
Curious, very traditional in her ways. Naturally a helper- she’s seen as somewhat of a mentor and leader to her peers.

*Adult Joyce- 30-45 year old, Native woman.
A pillar in her community. Fractured by her experience as a young girl torn from her family to be placed in residential school yet somewhat at peace with that experience. She portrays a sense that she came to terms with that incident and has grown to respect her Native culture and traditions while also understanding why the U. S. government made such a move to pull Native children from their homes to integrate them into White/Protestant culture.

*Emily Sam- 50- 65 years old, Native woman, Joyce’s grandmother.
Playful, kind, wise and intensely strong in character.

*Squaxin Woman- 20-30, Native woman.
A neighbor to Joyce’s family. A small part at the beginning of the play. Character could be combined with another/other small female adult parts in the play.

*Aunt Sophie- Age is flexible, Native woman.
A spirit relative of Joyce’s family. She guides Joyce through her most intense trials. Loving, kind, and helpful but stern enough to let Joyce think for herself to find the answers she needs. . Character could be combined with another/other small female adult parts in the play.

*Pitch Woman- A mythical figure in the Squaxin tribe. Age is flexible, Native woman preferred but as she will be cloaked in all black, can be flexible.
A mythical figure in the Squaxin tribe. Her lore was taught to disobedient children as a way to keep them safe. She has no speaking lines and is more of a spiritual presence in the play. Character could be combined with another/other small female adult parts in the play.

*Mud Bay Sam- 50-65 years old, Native male, Grandfather to Joyce.
A patriarchal figure in his community. He carries the tradition of “Rememberer” in his tribe, and as such is sought out to help tribal members stay aligned with their traditional beliefs and practices. Closely bonded to Joyce.

*Henry- 13-17, Native male, Joyce’s cousin.
Reticent to give up his traditional, Native ways for those of the new, White way of formal education, “manners”, and obedience. Residential schools have changed him and it strains the relationship between he and Joyce.

*Darin Longfeather- 17 (older looking teen or younger looking adult will work), Native male.
A fellow student at Joyce’s school. Has suffered the physical effects of reprimand per his White custodians for failing to fall in line. Internally he seems lost, confused and angry but outwardly portrays a shield of being tough and adverse to authority. His spirit is broken from so many attempts to leave residential schools and find home only to be forced back into the system.

*Longhouse- 28-40, Native male, Henry’s father.
Disappointed, confused and heartbroken at his son’s refusal to continue their Native ways. Fearful that their legacy will be lost with Henry.

*Twin River- 25-40, Native male, character can be doubled by another Native male character with few speaking lines.
Employed by the B.I.A. His presence with them is to help children feel more assured and complicit that the B.I.A. might be trusted. He helps them to collect children from local tribes to be sent to residential schools.

*Chief Seattle- 65-90, Native male
His presence in the play is more spirit and voiceover than that of a physical person. A physical person will be preferred but can make a voiceover work for this character.

*Mullin- 30-60, White male, character can be doubled by another White male character in the play
Authoritative persona, committed in his quest to gather Native children for reformation.

*Mr. Conrad- 30-50, White male
Extremely committed to the pledge he has taken to rehabilitate Native children to the ways of White culture and custom. Not apologetic or compromising in that quest whatsoever. Apathetic to the consequences Native children might endure from such uprooting of their traditional ways.

*Superintendent- 35-50, White female
Deeply committed to adhering to a strict culture of White teachings, culture and traditions ONLY. Superintendent is not willing to consider the point or purpose of entertaining Native children continuing their old ways.

*Miss Brennan- 25-50, White female
A teacher at the residential school, she’s charged with the student’s new reformation. Not as strict as superintendent but still very much dedicated to teaching the children the White way in an attempt to get them to leave their old traditions behind.

*Nurse Warner- late 20’s- late 30’s, White female
Nurse charged with the care of the students at the school.

*Dr. Buchanan- 40-65, White male
Head of the Tulalip school where Native children have been gathered for reformation. Sympathetic in his approach and friendly to the students. He’s somewhat of an advocate for the children until cornered without a powerful enough rebuttal.

*Otis- 6-12, Native male
Student at the school. Friends with Joyce.

*Girl One- 12-16, Native female
Student at the school

*Girl Two- Student- 12-17, Native female
Student at the school

*Young Girl- 6-11, Native Female
Student at the school

*Boy One 13- 17, Native Male
Student at the school

*Boy Two- 12-16, Native Male
Student at the school

*Young Boy- 6-11, Native Male
Student at the school